Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Try Kickboxing For Fitness

Try Kickboxing For Fitness


by Armando Bertels


If you're thinking about taking up kickboxing, you may want to make sure it's what you really want. It takes a special person to be able to handle the training and work it takes to go for a round in the ring.

If you're pretty sure that kickboxing is something you want to try, then commit to a longer program. Trainer's Elite in Addison offers a first class for free and several programs to choose from. Their ABS Kickboxing class teaches you real skills and that can help you feel more confident, defend yourself and even relieve stress. Go to www.trainserselite.net for details. Be prepared for a workout, this isn't like doing aerobics.

North Texas Mixed Martial Arts is a great place. For one flat fee they offer unlimited adult group classes. They also have an onsite pro shop, so you'll can't use your no mouth guard excuse. NTMMA features veteran instructors and true lovers of Martial Arts willing and able to help you go as far in your training as you want to go. Visit their website www.ntmma.com for a list of class schedules and a awesome collection of pictures of their top fighters.

If you know that Muay Thai is for you and you're ready to work really hard, a better place might be George Prevalsky's Boxing and Muay Thai club in Coppell. They feature a 24 class beginners program that focuses solely on the fundamentals like footwork, training and bag work. Then you still have intermediate and hard to go through. World class fighters train here and they do give private lessons. Also, Prevalsky's offers one class for free just to make sure it's for you, so go to www.muaythaiboxing.com and schedule your first training session.

Regardless of the level you choose, be ready for some serious sweating. Martial Artists have to have top notch endurance, strength and balance. All of which will be put to the test should you decide to find yourself at any one of these locations.




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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Learn The Best Thailand Boxing Technique

Learn The Best Thailand Boxing Technique


by Enrique Komara


Muay Thai gives the competitor an advantage in a fight, in and out of the ring. Let me start you of with a little of my background/ identity in relation to the sport of Muay Thai. Growing up as a kid in the Philippines in the 90's, I was always glued to the television watching Thai boxing competitions. I liked the sport as a kid, because I thought it was more "realistic" than boxing matches. To my surprise, the competitions that allowed elbows and knees ended quick (usually in the 1st and 2nd rounds). I've sparred in the ring and have been in a couple of street fights in high school (in the Philippines), and I can tell you from experience that the most brutal techniques always have an element of muay thai into it. Without further ado, LETS GET TO THE GOOD STUFF!!! (The techniques).

The first technique is the fakes, or feint attacks. This is very useful in the ring and deadly in the streets. In the ring, you don't have to hit your opponent first to make him react to a feint attack. In street fighting however, you must hit him first. Hit him hard and fast, and if he survived your first attack, your second attack could be a feint followed by a counter. Examples of this would be (from a right stance) feint a left cross and throw a right hook to the body, then clinch and follow with a right knee. Throw a left round house kick, then feint the second round house kick twist your body counter clockwise to load up your left hand, jump up with your right foot and execute a super man punch. Feint a right foot jab and throw a left super man punch. Feint a right hook to the head and do an uppercut. Feint a body shot and do a head shot (either hand). Feint a high kick and do a low leg kick (either leg). The possibilities are endless!

The second technique is the draw in. In a draw in, you make your opponent believe that you forgot all about your defenses and put one of your hands down to chest level or open up your guard. But make sure you are at a right distance relative to his weapons when you're doing this. You could do this by: Dropping your lead hand and timing your cross before he lands either a jab or a cross (when you do this, make sure you slip to the outside of his jab and to the inside of his cross), dropping your rear hand and timing a lead hook to his temple/jaw, leaning backward and executing timing a front/ rear foot jab (depending on distance), and again the possibilities are endless.

The third one is the clinch-push-attack technique. What is the clinch-push-attack technique? The clinch-push-attack technique is used when your opponent is to strong for your clinch game. At the moment he gets away from your clinch, push him away with either hand (only one hand please) and execute an attack relative to distance. If he is too close, throw a right/ left elbow. If he is too far, load up with the muay thai round kick to the thigh, body, or head. Hint: While he is off balance when he first gets away and is leaning forward, throw a round kick to the head. If he is leaning back throw one on the thigh. If he's hands are flailing to get his balance, throw a round kick to the body.

This article is in its infancy and I will be posting more techniques as soon as I get back from training. Remember: I only post techniques that work for at least 15-20 different people. If a technique does not work, don't throw it away like a scratch paper, vary your timing, distance, and positioning to make it work. And most importantly, do what works for you, but set it up to where the opponent does not know its coming.




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Friday, January 27, 2012

Thai Kickboxing

Thai Kickboxing


by Anna Vansyckle


As a practitioner of Muay Thai, I can say that this style is considered to be one of the most brutal styles of martial arts in the world. Muay Thai is one of the oldest styles in the world with at least two-thousand years of history. The reason Muay Thai is one of the most sought out martial arts styles in the world is due to its brutality and simplicity.

Muay Thai is defined as the "science of the eight limbs" with good reason. Practitioners of Muay Thai are trained to use eight limbs of the bodies: legs, knees, fists, and elbows. In a sense, Muay Thai can be considered an umbrella term. There are many different types of Muay Thai as they are many types of Kung-Fu. The most common form of Muay Thai is sport Muay Thai which uses gloves similar to that in Western Boxing. Practitioners are trained to strike with the hard bones of their bodies such as the knees and elbows. Those are some of the hardest bones in the human body. In terms of kicking, Muay Thai fighters attack with the shins instead of the feet for spin kicks and roundhouse kicks.

There are two kicks that use the shins instead of the feet: the Thai roundhouse kick and the Thai spinning sweep kick. Getting hit by a Thai roundhouse is similar to getting smacked by an aluminum bat. You can do a lot of damage to your opponent's legs with the Thai spinning sweep kick. Both types of attacks are fairly easy to use. Thai fighters are trained to hit certain spots in the body.

Due to the nature, Muay Thai fights are extremely brutal. However, Muay Thai is the national sport of Thailand. Professional Muay Thai fighters have the same celebrity status as entertainers and sports stars in the United States. Muay Thai is considered a main livelihood which explains why many take up the path of being a Muay Thai fighter.

In short, Muay Thai is one of the ancient styles of fighting. One must be careful when training in Muay Thai and one must be careful when sparring against someone in Muay Thai. This style is one of the most sought out styles to learn in the world of mixed martial arts. Due to simplicity and brutality of Muay Thai, the style is part of almost any mixed martial arts school curriculum. Many UFC and Pride FC fighters have recognized the superior of Muay Thai over traditional styles such as Tae Kwon Do and Karate with good reason.

Muay Thai fighters are good at both long-range and close-range striking. In close quarters combat, the Muay Thai fighter has the advantage in striking and a bit of grappling. If you are not a good grappler and you get into a close range fight with a Muay Thai fighter, it will not be pretty on your end.

Overall, Muay Thai is a style with very much substance. This is one style that deserves the utmost respect. There are variations of Muay Thai. The Burmese use Lethwei which is merely Muay Thai with headbutts. There is no significant difference between the styles. In the past, Muay Thai did have headbutting attacks but were disallowed.

The Royal Thai Army uses Lerdrit which is the military form of Muay Thai. Punches are taken out and replaced with joint locks, grapples, chops, and palm strikes.

While Muay Thai is mainly used for sporting events, it should not be discounted as a possible self-defense style. In self-defense, you do not care how much damage you cause your attack. You simply hurt your attacker hard and retreat. Muay Thai can deliver that.

For this reason, Muay Thai is not only a deadly style but a superior style.




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Traditional Muay Thai Fights

Traditional Muay Thai Fights


by Anna Vansyckle


When I first came to Thailand, I went to see a live Muay Thai (Thai boxing) match and, during the match, my Thai boyfriend told me a Kung Fu fighter had never beaten a Muay Thai kickboxer. I don't know if this is true, but what it did tell me was Thais are very proud of their national sport. Muay Thai is also known as Thai kickboxing and has become very popular with westerners as well as Thais, both to watch Muay Thai and to learn to do it. Many tourists who come to Bangkok want to watch a live Muay Thai match but are not always sure where to go. Muay Thai can be seen in many places in Bangkok, but these Muay Thai (Thai boxing) venues are the main ones.

Lumpini Stadium (known in Thai as Sanam Muay Lumpini) - This seems to be the main Muay Thai (Thai kickboxing) stadium in Bangkok. Lumpini Muay Thai Stadium is also where I went to see my first Thai kickboxing matches. It's only open on Tuesday and Friday evenings (6:30-11pm) and Saturday afternoons and evenings (4:30-8pm and 8pm to 12pm) with around eight matches each night, plus a main match. When I was there, the main Muay Thai match was between a Thai guy and a farang (westerner), who was from Holland. Surprisingly, even though my Thai boyfriend thought otherwise, the farang Muay Thai kickboxer easily won the match.

Lumpini Stadium is very crowded, so expect a lot of noise, but it's a really fun night out. Be warned though, where Thais pay 'Thai price' of only a couple of hundred baht (about $4 per ticket), westerners pay a lot more. When I went the price for an average ticket for a westerner was more than $20 and I've heard it's gone up since. Plus, if you want to sit ringside, which a lot of westerners do, it's even more expensive. For me, I prefer to sit among the Thais on the 'normal seats' as you really feel like you're part of the event, and not segregated in a roped-off area up at the front. Games are also televised on Thai TV, so you can watch in your hotel room or at many Bangkok bars.

Lumpini Stadium is on Rama IV Road in Bangkok and you can call them at 02-251-4303 for more information, although expect to have some problems as anyone who answers the phone is likely to have limited English skills.

Ratchadamnoen Stadium (known in Thai as Sanam Muay Ratchadamnoen) - This is the more expensive Bangkok Thai kickboxing venue with tickets starting at 1,000 baht (around $28) and going up to 2,000 (around $65), which is incredibly expensive in Thailand. Ratchadamnoen Stadium has the usual Muay Thai matches (around eight every night they're open) with opening days the opposite of Lumpini Stadium, so you can see a Thai boxing match every night.

Ratchadamnoen Stadium is open on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from 6:30pm to 11pm and on Sundays from 4pm until 12am. Most of the matches are also televised on Thai TV, so if you don't want to spend the money, you can also head out to one of many bars in Bangkok that will be showing the match on TV. Ratchadamnoen Stadium is on Ratchadamnoen Avenue (also spelled Rajadamnoen) near the offices of the Thai Tourism Authority. Call them at 02-281-4205.

Local Temples and Fairs - Some of the local temples and fairs will also occasionally have Muay Thai kickboxing matches. Ask your hotel reception desk, if you're staying at a hotel, as there will be lots of local places you can watch a Muay Thai match, that will be a nominal entrance fee or free.

Lumpini Park - You can also go to Lumpini Park during the daytime, where there are often Muay Thai fighters practicing or having sparring matches with friends. They're more than happy to let you watch them, although most won't speak enough English for you to have a conversation.

While in Bangkok you'll find there are tons of Muay Thai venues from the big stadiums like Lumpini and Ratchadamnoen to smaller ones, local temples and fairs. Just remember, when you get there, ignore the touts who sell tickets for a much higher price than normal entrance fee, and buy a ticket at the ticket office. Expect to pay 'farang price' (higher price for westerners) though as only Thais get 'Thai price'.




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Sunday, January 15, 2012

Muay Thai Kickboxing Gear

Muay Thai Kickboxing Gear


by Reggie Aki


The root of full contact kick-boxing can be traced back to Thailand 2000 years ago, where the art of Muay Thai fighting started. Kick-boxing has been practiced for thousands of years, but did not become popular in the United States of America until the early 1960's, where kick-boxing has become an extreme sport for the extreme contender. America did not recognize kick-boxing in the formal circuit until 1970 and it is a swiftly growing sport.

The difference between kick-boxing and regular boxing is the work "Kick". The kicks are what take kick-boxing to a whole different level than regular boxing. The most common kicks used by the fighters today are the, front kick, side kick and the round house. Most of kick-boxing can be traced back to a form of martial arts such as, but not limited to;

Karate Judo Ju Jitsu Tae Kwando Muay Thai (Thai Boxing) Kapo Luta

Take any one of these martial arts and combine the fundamentals with boxing and you have a very aggressive, powerful and conniving fighter, who with one quick move could take his opponent to out. This form of fighting is much more dangerous than regular fist to fist boxing with gloves, because of the light weight gloves used and the use of kicking allows for a more powerful delivery.

The art of kick-boxing teaches strength, discipline, focus and defense; it is a great competitive sport and offers a total body workout. True kick-boxing is the art of defending and attacking ones opponent, Kick-boxers wear certain equipment and clothes that assist in protection and are used for easy movement, like mouth pieces, fight shorts, gloves, shin guards, all of these are used while the fighter punches, kicks and grapples with his opponent. Below is a list of the most common gear worn in the kick-boxing industry today and their prices.

Head Gear (leather with or without face cage)- 19.99 Revgear Cardio Wrap hand wrap- from 7.99 to 24.99 Pro Spar Shin Guard and instep- 34.99 Pro Spar Punches-Gloves- 34.99 Pro Spar Foam rib & ab guard- 44.95 Revgear Long Sleeve T shirt- 39.99 Revgear Fight Shorts- 49.99 Muay Thai Fight Shorts- 49.99 Focus Mitts- 49.99 Revgear Challenger MMA Grappling Gloves- 49.99 Revgear Platinum Leather Gloves- 79.99 Compression Shorts with Protective Flex Cup- 39.99

Mouth Pieces:

Shock Doctor-Gel Max- 19.99 Shock Doctor Pro- 9.99 Shock Doctor Power Double- 37.99 Shock Doctor-Braces- 29.99 Shock Doctor Power Ultra Gel- 34.99

Any of these apparel items can be found on-line at www.revgear.com.

As the art of Kick-boxing or Mixed Martial Arts some call it, takes on its new transformation in the western countries and we continue to take the sport to a whole new level, we also watch the apparel change as well. Once before they were extremely expensive, just like any other trend, with time the prices have come down and made it more affordable to be able to participate in.




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Friday, January 13, 2012

Using Martial Arts Teachers Association Classes

Using Martial Arts Teachers Association Classes


by Mercedes Stuart


People are just starting to realize, it's not going and paying for just any MA instruction, it's being sure the classes and the business itself is run by those properly trained. Look for those in the Martial Arts Teachers Association and you'll have better luck finding the right classes. After all, almost anyone can give you a few lessons in self defense, but it's also about making sure your children are safe.

You've all heard the horror stories on teachers of various academic and physical endeavors who take advantage of their students in one way or another. Whether it's harassment of a sexual nature, or just plain bad teaching, not only are you paying for this, but you're also trusting your children with them.

Those trainers who take the time to join the proper organizations actually want to teach and enjoy it. The organizations also offer their members a variety of resources to help build their business the right way. And of course, many of them take the time to research those who want to join to make sure they have the proper credentials.

Take the time before you sign up and pay for a class of any nature to establish a rapport with the teachers, make sure they belong to specific organizations and have the education not just in their field but in teaching in general.

By taking the time to study the educational facility you and your children will be a lot happier. Most people understand that MA training does more than just help get the student get physically fit, it's also about focus and mind control.

In today's world there are a wide assortment of classes you can engage your children in. One of them should be some sort of physical training. Martial Arts teaches children an amazing amount of not just physical attributes but also, understanding focus and controlling their emotions and mind.




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Boxing or MMA which is the better Sportsman?

Boxing or MMA which is the better Sportsman?


by Mary Smith


First of all, what is your definition of an athlete? An athlete is an individual trained or gifted in exercises or contests involving physical agility, staying power, strength, and psychological capability in an athletic activity. So who's the better athlete a mixed martial artist or boxer? This is a difficult question simply because they are 2 different sports. It's like asking who's better, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Ali, or Honey Ruth? In my judgment, I suspect that a mixed martial artist is a better athlete or MMA as it is famous as.

My reasoning for this is that mixed martial arts experts need to coach in many different styles of fighting, including boxing. There's just much far more styles to learn,eg judo, kick boxing, kung-fu, nin-jitsu, muay thai, tae kwon do, and the list grows. The far more knowledgeable and well-rounded boxer you are in the many selfdefense skills, the better boxer you will be in MMA. That's the reason why it is known as "mixed martial arts." Boxing does not include on-the-ground techniques, kicks, and grappling. It is all fists (with thicker gloves than MMA), standing, above the belt fighting. Don't get me wrong, I adore boxing. It too , includes well-rounded athletes, nevertheless it appears to me it is typically all about Endurance, particularly boxing today.

Where did all the great fights go with the pure knockouts, by folks love Ali and Tyson in his prime? Who want to see a winner decided by judges? No one. That barely happens in MMA. Folks want to see a knockout or a tap out with an undisputable winner. I personally know a street boxer turned boxer turned MMA boxer. He was hunting for much more of a challenge. He fights locally and latterly had his first fight in MMA over in the US and said the training is much more intense and he has learned tons much more. His record in boxing is 35-1 and MMA is 1-0. Look him up on you tube "Chris Lozano MMA," he's going to blow up in a few years I guarantee it.

Anyway he's the perfect example of why a mixed martial artist is a better athlete, it's just harder. You will never see a professional boxer get in the cage with a mixed martial artist or a MMA go 12 rounds in the ring with a boxer. In the end, I still think that a mixed martial artist is the better athlete given the 2 completely different sports. MMA is just much more physical and there's so much much more you can do and learn.

You have got to be silly if you believe mixed martial-arts isn't a "Real" sport. It's been around for centuries and it's just recently becoming highly popular these past one or two years. It's one of the swiftest growing sports around. If MMA isn't considered a sport I don't think nothing should be. MMA may be the most physically demanding sport around.

MMA fighters need to be centered or they will get hurt. It is much more physical than boxing, football, Rugby, and tennis so why shouldn't it be regarded as a real sport? It want strength, speed, staying power, and supplements for focus. A sport is an athletic activity requiring capability and/or physical capability of a competitive nature. MMA is that and so much much more. I am essentially surprised that MMA is not thought to be a "REAL" sport to a few individuals. I hadn't got any idea that folks thought that. I want one of them to give me an explanation why they don't think MMA is a real sport just because that blows my mind and they obviously haven't a clue what it takes both mentaly & physicaly to become an MMA athlete.




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